Lessons learned by observing

Hello Friends, I had the pleasure of spending a 45-minute recess with our (6-12) students recently.  It was a perfect autumn day: bright, crisp, and the trees were all dressed up in gold and burgundy.  As I looked around, I was reminded of the essential role Play has in our development.  I watched two girls swoosh down the slide again and again, giggling the whole time – delighted by good company, fresh air and the playful tug of gravity.  A child hung upside down from her knees, like a bat, and watched the world from a different perspective. One boy, …

Lessons learned by observing

Hello Friends, I had the pleasure of spending a 45-minute recess with our (6-12) students recently.  It was a perfect autumn day: bright, crisp, and the trees were all dressed up in gold and burgundy.  As I looked around, I was reminded of the essential role Play has in our development.  I watched two girls swoosh down the slide again and again, giggling the whole time – delighted by good company, fresh air and the playful tug of gravity.  A child hung upside down from her knees, like a bat, and watched the world from a different perspective. One boy, …

Strings students gave a recital in College Hill

This past weekend, New School Montessori strings teacher, Melissa Robinson, had a recital at Red Rose Gems Pizzeria in College Hill. It was an open mic-type event with students taking the stage one at a time, while the audience enjoyed a delicious meal. Melissa reported that everyone had a lot of fun and that the kids did a really great job! Here are a few photos from the event.

Students planted seeds, looking ahead to what butterflies will need this spring

New School Montessori parent Carrie Driehaus came earlier this fall to show her butterflies and to talk with students about her backyard garden and the choices she has made in selecting plantings that are both beautiful and vital to the various stages of a butterfly’s lifecycle. The kids loved learning about monarchs and helped Carrie prepare and plant their preprimary garden this fall to give these plants a head start. These varieties of seeds can grow strong roots, remain dormant during the winter and be ready to go as soon as temperatures warm up! Students weeded and used care to plant …

Non-nappers made clay pots and chocalho and pandeiro instruments

New School Montessori teacher Nadja Nether shared her Brazilian heritage by taking her students on a “trip” to Brazil where they learned how Brazilians have used items from nature to create instruments and clay pots. Students learned how clay is taken from the ground, worked into coils and wound into different-shaped pots. Dried seeds in gourds can be used as shakers to make music, but over the years percussion players have gotten a louder sound using other materials. One of the traditional Brazilian instruments the children made was a chocalho (meaning rattle in Portuguese) the other was a pandeiro (tambourine).  …

Estimating the weight of objects in grams

Jean and Sophia introduced their 3rd grade students to the thrill of estimating and measuring weight in grams and kilograms using a variety of scales. Don’t be surprised if your student comes home wanting to pull out the bathroom scales to estimate the weight of every trinket in the house.      

Who Are You Going to Call?

Forty percent of students at The New School Montessori between 2nd and 6th grade take part in our after-school club’s orchestra and strings program. Melissa Robinson founded our strings program in 2011 and has been challenging and engaging the children at all levels with music that interests them ever since.   Enjoy TNSM’s rendition of “Who Are You Going to Call – Ghost Busters! And feel free to to sing along with the audience.  

Preparation and discovery are part of the fun of learning

New School Montessori students in 1st-3rd grade studied owl pellets. Mysteries were revealed while students investigated hair and bone fragments for clues. The prepared environment is a key component of a Montessori classroom. and(6-9) teacher Sophia McAllister knows the secret to education is “not filling a bucket but lighting a fire.” Here is a snapshot into her carefully prepared classroom as the students explored owl pellets.