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Visual Thinking Strategies at TNSM

The New School Montessori Looks at Art in a New Way. Since its inception, 44 years ago, The New School Montessori has been doing things a little differently. Founded by a group of progressive parents looking for an alternative to the traditional form of education that was being offered in local public schools, The New School Montessori began a journey that has kept them experimenting and asking new questions about how best to teach children. So it should come as no surprise to hear that The New School’s professional development day for its teachers on November 7 is dedicated to looking at art…in new ways. …

Days 1-3 at Harvard’s Art of Leadership: Improving Schools

Hello TNSM! I am having an amazing time here at Harvard and can’t wait to share all my experiences with you when I return. That being said, I’m just too excited not to share a little right now! Day 1: Two remarkable educational leaders shared their journeys and discoveries with us. Dr. William Henderson had been a principal for over 30 years. He began to loose his sight as a young man and by thirty was blind. Although he was encouraged to quit working and collect disability, he decided instead to turn his visual limitations into strengths. He became a …

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Montessori: Pulling Education out of the Past and Launching It into the Future

By: TNSM Director, Jeff Groh Angeline Stoll Lillard’s book, Montessori: The Science Behind the Genius, begins with this sentence: “Two fundamental cornerstones of American schooling today were placed at the turn of the 20th Century: the school as a factory and the child as a blank slate.” Modern research shows that both of these ideas are outdated and ineffective when it comes to educating children, and yet, they remain deeply embedded in the educational models of the United States. The first, the school as a factory, was the result of mass public education spreading across America starting in the mid-19th …

Why the Arts Matter

There used to be a story that went like this:  You go to school, you go to college, you get a job, and you remain at that job for the next 30 years and then retire.  It was a linear story, it moved in one direction.  That story no longer exists. Life is not linear. It is organic and unpredictable. Now more than ever. Here are facts that drive this point home: It is estimated that today’s students will have 10-14 jobs by the age of 38. 1 out of 4 workers today is working for a company they have …